Posts Tagged ‘somerset studio’

Mysterious Happenings

September 7, 2017

The September/October issue of Somerset Studio is here and I was pleased to find three pieces I’d submitted in their “Expressions” section. The challenge for their Halloween issue had been to create artwork based on the young-adult novel Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar ChildrenThe author, Ransom Riggs, had been inspired by highly unusual (and slightly disturbing) photographs of people on Victorian cabinet cards, and photographs of the actual cards are sprinkled throughout the book.

I love all things related to Halloween, especially as it was celebrated in the distant past, when things were just a bit more serious and a bit more…creepy. I searched for old photos on the internet and found a couple that could easily be construed as a bit odd or menacing, given the right context. After creating two pieces called “Secrets” and “Poison,” I decided to go in search of a real cabinet card to add authenticity to my next effort.

Within a few days, I was pawing through a shoe box full of vintage photographs at a favorite day-trip destination, the Webster flea market. My lucky find was a prim Victorian lady, all buttoned up in a long-sleeved frock, her unruly hair pulled severely back and pinned into submission. She sits very still for the photograph, but her expression hints at thoughts that are somewhere else entirely. What could be going on behind those pale, unfocused eyes?

Clearly what I had here was the portrait of a Victorian serial killer! Her victims? A string of ailing dowagers, each of whom had entrusted her with their care, and none of whom suspected she was after their money. She was extremely kind and caring (all faked), and came with excellent references (all forged) from well-respected members of society (now all deceased). What’s a girl to do when she wants a new frock, but the old gal hasn’t popped off yet? She tells herself her actions are “merciful,” but her eyes reveal the truth! And thus do the eyes of her victims, which haunt her wherever she goes…

haunted photo

Not content with confining themselves to haunting our deadly caretaker, these vengeful ghosts played tricks with my instructions for the piece as well! Where I had written “ink,” “tissue paper,” “paper napkins”, “white china marker” and “cardstock,” those naughty gremlins substituted “paint”, “paper towel”, “decorate tape”, “tissue paper”, “white crayon” and “cardboard”! Worse, they changed the title from “Haunted” to “Strychnine! Poison.” So don’t be fooled, gentle readers, and never let your guard down when it comes to those you have wronged!

Bwaaaaa-hahahahahaaaaaaaaaaaaa…

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Scrappy Tag Books

June 14, 2017

What a thrill it was to open my mailbox today to find an advanced artist’s copy of my favorite magazine, Somerset Studio! They had put out a call for tag art a few months ago, and, because I have approximately 900 tags (this is no exaggeration), I thought it would be fun to make a few tag books to send along. I hadn’t sent anything for publication in a very long time, and I missed the excitement of being published.

som studio jul aug 2017

They did a great job editing my article and the photography is breathtaking (as always). One thing did disappoint me a teeny bit: I had sent three books in, and you can see all three stacked up in one photo, but they did not show the cover of the third book, which happens to be my favorite.

bird-tag-book-1

But as Dude very practically pointed out, “They liked the other two best.” And he’s right; I can’t complain. I love how the article turned out. I’ve always said, it’s wonderful – and essential – that everyone is different with their unique likes and dislikes. Thank you, Stampington!

Gelli Cats

May 14, 2015

In the Jan/Feb issue of Somerset Studio, there’s an article by Melissa Johnson explaining how she’d made a piece called “Jeweled Elephant.” You can see most of it here by clicking on the table of contents image near the bottom of the page.

I was so intrigued by the process that I wanted to try it right away. Some of the prettiest papers I have are those made with the Gelli Plate; I have a giant stack of them made on deli paper. I chose three of my favorites and glued them down to 7″x8″ pieces of manila file folders with Mod Podge.

Elephants are nice, but I’m a cat person, so I chose a silhouette of a cat from Google image search, traced around it on another piece of manila file folder, then cut it out and used it as a mask.

gelli cat 1

After brushing acrylic paint all over the folder, I removed the mask to reveal…a Gelli cat!

gelli cat 2

I added more color to each piece by applying and smearing Gelatos with my finger (actually, Gel Sticks, which are the “kids” version of Gelatos; I can discern no difference between them except the price). The deli paper crinkles and wrinkles nicely, which makes it easy to add texture. A few dots of acrylic paint at the bottom, swirls with a gel pen and stamped words completed each piece.

gelli cat 3

These were still a little curvy when I photographed them; a few hours under some heavy books flattened them nicely. They’re the perfect size to add to my art journal.

These were fun and fast experiments – all three took less than an hour total before the stamped words were added – and I’m quite happy to have this great technique in my repertoire!